Treasure Update

I've updated the treasure document, for what I hope will be its release in Fight On!

It can be found here. What is it?

From the document:
What did historical looters find of value?
Art.
Goods.
Furnishings.
Where are the tables for these things? Well, completely unsatisfied with every hodgepodge treasure table scattered all over the universe, I decided to compile a little document that would help me when preparing my games. Now you can roll up an 800 gp armoire that the players will walk right past when you roll that 20 for room contents. (Unguarded treasure?!) Now you can put more than enough treasure in the game for the players, and leave it up to them if they want to sell their diamond bells, or try to figure out how to move their 500 pounds of iron ingots. Now you can actually *know* how difficult to move whatever they find actually is.

Inside you can find information on how to describe magical swords, what treasure containers could exist, how to generate hoards containing items such as art, gems, jewelry, coins, goods, furnishings, and clothing as well as how to describe in detail each of the items above.

It's totally free - if you take it, and like it, please comment about it, either here, by e-mail or in your blog. I'd love to know if anyone is using this document and what they think.

20 comments:

  1. Your treasure doc is very cool & full of all sorts fo goodness! Thanks

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  2. Oh, my goodness, this is nice. Thank you.

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  3. Thanks so much for the kind comments. Remember to spread the word!

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  4. This is fucking awesome! No wait, this is dripping awesome sauce!! No,No, this is like dripping awesome sauce all over my girlfriends face!!!

    -Nunya

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  5. Well, uh, thanks, Nunya. :-)

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  6. This is very cool and extremely useful. Thanks!

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  7. Man you write awesome stuff! I especially dug the psionics book.

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  8. More great information! I love this blog. I'm filling my DM notebook with great information. My players and I thank you greatly!

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  9. This will be most useful as i constantly find myself at lost for interesting non-magucal treasure. Thank you for a wonderful table. This should be in every and all DMGs.

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  10. This is the best that has happened to me this month, rpg-wise. Thank you.

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  11. I have used both this treasure table and the Table for Avoiding Death to great effect in my Pathfinder game. I don't know 100% how much my players care about the more detailed treasure hordes, but I sure as heck enjoy giving them more detailed treasure hordes. And everyone enjoys the Wound table immensely; they both like getting descriptions of what they do when they drop an enemy, and getting a chance to get themselves out of a mess when they are dropped to zero hit points, instead of just falling unconscious. None of them have been seriously wounded yet, but tomorrow the chances are high. Thank you for the great resources!

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  12. Thank you for putting this together! After rediscovering this pdf, it became regular to consult it for inspiration (most lately when contributing to the Hill Giant Hall BFRPG adventure, first part of the Saga of the Giants).

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  13. >>Where are the tables for these things?

    Have a look at D&D co-creator Dave Arneson's Adventures in Fantasy rpg (1979), Book of Creatures and Treasures, pages 34 & 35.

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  14. One thing that is somewhat confusing in this document, and I do not know if this is explained somewhere in the document that I have simply have not ever noticed, is that sometimes in a table, there will be additional die rolls listed in parentheses. The age of art table, which is on page 5 of this treasure document, exemplifies this, with numerous parenthetic values listed near the bottom of the table.

    Is there some place that I have not seen which explains this notation? How are these parenthetic values on a table actually meant to be interpreted?

    Thanks

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    1. Sure. If you roll the number on the outside (usually 20), you reroll a 20 to get an 'exploded' value. This is because there is only a 1 in 400 chance of finding something really insanely valuable, and if you roll a 20, you're likely to find something really special.

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    2. Oh.... of COURSE. It seems so obvious now that you've said it, I can't believe that I had to even ask about it in the first place. Thank you.

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  15. Couldn't find your email (I only looked on the site and your patreon page for about ten minutes so I might have missed it) so figured I'd post it here. I've got this treasure document and the tricks and traps one printed out in a sort of D&D handbook I've got for general gaming and they are really awesome. Except the print is teeny-tiny and I'm having trouble just reading it. I know my eyes are getting worse, but even when I first got it the text wasn't all that easy to read. If you ever put out another version of this a bigger not-so-thin font would be wonderful.

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  16. I've just happened across this piece, and I think it's excellent. I have often tried to get players to 'loot in style' by leaving all kinds of rugs and textiles available, but nobody ever took the bait. I can't believe they always leave this kind of stuff lying behind them. My minds eye always had a chamber like this in mind - http://www.thehistoryblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/chariots-in-tut-antechamber.jpg .
    This article will certainly get a lot of use from me. Thank you!

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  17. This is a phenomenal work I reference before and during every session. Well organized, imaginative, and comprehensive. Great job -C!

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